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Photoselective shade nets in strawberry crops to inhibit flowering

Photoselective shade nets in strawberry crops to inhibit flowering

Positive Effect of Phytochrome Manipulation with Red and Far-Red Light to Inhibit Floral Budding in Strawberries

The spectral composition of radiation influences flowering and its induction, which can be managed through the application of photoselective shade nets in strawberry cultivation. Particularly, red and blue shade nets have an inhibitory effect. The quality of the spectral band also impacts the photoperiodic response. In fact, the red light necessary to create long-day conditions and thus delay flowering can be achieve with far-red light or a combination of far-red and low-frequency red light.

yellow shade netting installed for shading crops
OBAMALLA® photoselective shade netting helps strawberry crops to achieve an incredible development.

Effects of Light and Temperature on the Onset of Flowering and Strawberry Growth

Strawberry Response to Photoperiod

Photoperiod is a primary environmental factor that controls the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. The optimal photoperiod and the number of induction cycles required for most plants to flower depend on temperature and cultivar. Temperature is another crucial factor to consider when studying photoperiodic responses in strawberries, often interacting with photoperiod to induce responses. A third factor affecting photoperiodic response is the plant’s prior conditioning (i.e., chilling temperatures). Flower initiation in short-day strawberries can be regulate by light quality, with phytochrome potentially involved in the flowering process. An 8-hour photoperiod can be extended to 16.5 hours using red (fluorescent light), far-red (incandescent light), or a 1:1 ratio of red to far-red light.

Comparative Results of Photoselective Shade Nets Treatment in Strawberry Cultivation

Temperature’s Influence on Yield and Quality of Three Japanese Strawberry Cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) (“Sachinoka,” “Benihoppe,” and “Tochiotome”)

INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON THE YIELD AND QUALITY OF THREE STRAWBERRY ( Fragaria * anannasa Duch) CULTIVARS 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.1014.1983&rep=rep1&type=pdf
shading netting used on crop field
With the use of the OBAMALLA® shading net, crops obtain better results in terms of growth also quality.

Yield Parameters

Yield parameters include fruit length, fruit weight, fruit width, and the number of fruits harvested per plant. Quality parameters are fruit color and firmness. Other vegetative growth parameters include leaf length and leaf area. The optimal day/night temperature for fruit development, length, width, and weight was 26/14 ºC. These parameters decreased as the temperature increased throughout the study period. Additionally, fruit firmness decreased as temperature increased. The fruit’s surface color became darker and more intensely pigmented when the temperature rose to 34/23 ºC.

Strawberries: Suitable Environmental Conditions

Strawberry plants are highly sensitive to environmental variations. Factors such as water availability, day and night temperatures, and natural light intensity affect fruit size. Temperature stress is a significant challenge for strawberry production worldwide. Field-grown plants often experience fluctuating temperatures that profoundly affect plant metabolism. Reduced plant growth due to high temperatures have be widely document in horticultural crops like tomatoes, grapes, and strawberries. Generally, exposure to high temperatures (35ºC) results in reduced vegetative growth and yield. High temperatures adversely affect vegetative growth and fruit quality in tomatoes.

Effect of Temperature on Total Fruit Number per Plant

The number of strawberry flowers and fruits is related to the number and diameter of crowns, which are indicators of the plant’s yield potential. Genetic and environmental variations are not the only factors affecting strawberry production. Temperature and climatic factors such as humidity also influence strawberry production. The highest fruit numbers were recorded with shade nets. As maximum and minimum temperatures increase, plant growth decreases. High temperatures inhibit cellular metabolism and chloroplast biogenesis, reduce chloroplast photoreductive activity, and alter lipid-protein interactions, ultimately decreasing photosynthetic capacity.

crops protected with shade netting
Crops placed under the photoselective agricultural shading nets show good quality results.

Effect of Temperature on Fresh Fruit Weight, Fruit Length, and Fruit Width

Fresh fruit weight, fruit width, and fruit length are crucial quality factors for strawberries also depend on the plant’s water content. Fresh fruit weight, fruit length, also fruit width decrease as temperature increases. Strawberry yield also fresh fruit weight are negatively affect by rising temperatures.

Effect of Temperature on Leaf Area and Leaf Height

A plant’s ability to photosynthesize, leading to subsequent fruit production, heavily depends on leaf area. The leaf surface serves as a light interception point and entry point for chlorophyll, which are vital for the growth and development of all plants. However, strawberries grown at higher temperatures have smaller leaf sizes and leaf areas. Additionally, canopy development in strawberries is more limited at warmer temperatures, leading to lower photosynthesis rates and reduced fruit yield. At higher temperatures, more assimilates are direct towards shoot development rather than fruit development (fruit weight, width, and length).

Photoselective Shade Nets Affects Flowering in Long Days in Short-Day Strawberry Cultivars

HORTSCIENCE 43(7):2245–2247. 2008. Red Light Affects Flowering Under Long Days in a Short-day Strawberry Cultivar Fumiomi Takeda and D. Michael Glenn

https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/5532/Takeda%20et%20al%202008%20red%20light.pdf

A high proportion of far-red light plays a role in floral bud induction. Thus, transplants of some short-day cultivars made in early July can flower and fruit in the fall and the following spring, allowing producers to harvest two crops within one year from a single planting. Treating strawberry crowns with red light (600-702 nm) reduces or delays flowering.

Photoselective Shade Nets
The resistance of OBAMALLA® green agricultural shade netting creates a suitable environment by stabilizing the intensity of UV rays.

Soil temperature can also have a direct or indirect effect on vegetative growth. Mulches that keep soil temperatures below 25°C promote greater reproductive development. Strawberries can have their fruiting season advanced or extended as long as the net provides a suitable temperature. Covering the plants from fall to the beginning of flowering in spring increases average temperature, leaf growth, inflorescence, and flower number. Low-temperature and short-day treatments are use to precondition nursery plants. Plants are maintained at temperatures above 5°C to prevent deep dormancy and promote continuous growth and flowering. Plants are often grow in tunnels or under shade nets to protect the fruits from adverse weather conditions.

Effect of Far-Red Light, Temperature, and Plant Age on Morphological Changes and Floral Induction in Strawberries

Effect of far-red light, temperature, and plant age on morphological changes also induction of flowering of a ‘June-bearing’ strawberry

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13580-016-0018-8

The Effects of Conditioning Strawberry Plug Plants under Altered Red/Far-red Light Environments

Brent L. Black, Harry J. Swartz and Gerald F. Deitzer, Bryan Butler, Craig K. Chandler

http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/40/5/1263.short

FLORAL INITIATION IN STRAWBERRY AND SOME EFFECTS OF RED AND FAR-RED RADIATION AS COMPONENTS OF CONTINUOUS WHITE LIGHT

W. B. Collins

Canadian Journal of Botany, 1966, 44(5): 663-668, https://doi.org/10.1139/b66-079

Significant floral induction in strawberry plants has been demonstrated with red light treatment. Altering red/far-red light using selective plastic films has shown effects on strawberry plant performance. In the first year, red light filtering film accelerated fruiting. However, in the second year, the effect of the red light filtering film was not significant.

Photoselective Shade Nets
Applying this OBAMALLA® woven mesh to your crops creates an environment with a pleasant temperature also ventilation for your crops.

Organic Raspberry Production in Tunnels

Organic Raspberry Production in Three-Season High Tunnels

http://www.canr.msu.edu/foodsystems/uploads/files/high_tunnel_raspberry_production.pdf
http://www.hort.cornell.edu/fruit/pdfs/low-tunnel-strawberries.pdf

Tunnels offer several potential advantages for raspberry production in humid regions:

•Increased plant yield.

•Extended harvest and marketing season.

•Higher berry yield.

•Reduced pests and diseases.

For organic producers, these benefits are particularly valuable since pesticide options are limited. Photoselective shade nets in strawberry cultivation vary light transmittance also provide adequate ventilation. They also reduce temperature by detecting infrared light and diffusing it. Photoselective shade nets are especially useful in strawberry cultivation, as optimal summer temperatures are below 26°C. To optimize yield, applying weed control nets is also recommend, acting as a barrier against weeds. Fungal diseases are greatly suppressed by keeping plants in non-humid environments.

Issues with Mold

Botrytis gray mold, a common field problem, is rare in protected environments. A significant limitation for strawberry growers is the short season during which berries are usually available for sale. Extending the berry production season into summer and late fall would be highly beneficial, opening new markets. Plastic nets protect berries and extend their season. Photoselective shade nets significantly reduce ultraviolet light that would typically promote fungal spore germination and reduce infrared light that produces heat. Thus, the season can be extended both before and after the typical season, ranging from 3 weeks to 5 months.

shade netting installed on the field for protection
This raschel mesh provides strong support by stabilizing the sun’s temperature so that crops are not damaged.

One advantage of nets is the near elimination of Botrytis gray mold as they limit humidity and inhibit spore germination by reducing ultraviolet light. Generally, pest incidence (gray mold and powdery mildew) is low under nets as long as fruit is regularly harvest and not left to rot in the field. Shade nets provide enough air circulation for flowers to be pollinated without bees. Humidity is reduce, so fruit rot is lower, and they retain enough heat during cold nights to prevent early frost and extend the season. Yields are substantially higher, and more of the harvest is marketable. Additionally, material costs are quickly recover through increase yields.

Fill out the form below to let us know your questions or comments:

Positive Effect of Phytochrome Manipulation with Red and Far-Red Light to Inhibit Floral Budding in Strawberries

The spectral composition of radiation influences flowering and its induction, which can be managed through the application of photoselective shade nets in strawberry cultivation. Particularly, red and blue shade nets have an inhibitory effect. The quality of the spectral band also impacts the photoperiodic response. In fact, the red light necessary to create long-day conditions and thus delay flowering can be achieve with far-red light or a combination of far-red and low-frequency red light.

yellow shade netting installed for shading crops
OBAMALLA® photoselective shade netting helps strawberry crops to achieve an incredible development.

Effects of Light and Temperature on the Onset of Flowering and Strawberry Growth

Strawberry Response to Photoperiod

Photoperiod is a primary environmental factor that controls the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. The optimal photoperiod and the number of induction cycles required for most plants to flower depend on temperature and cultivar. Temperature is another crucial factor to consider when studying photoperiodic responses in strawberries, often interacting with photoperiod to induce responses. A third factor affecting photoperiodic response is the plant’s prior conditioning (i.e., chilling temperatures). Flower initiation in short-day strawberries can be regulate by light quality, with phytochrome potentially involved in the flowering process. An 8-hour photoperiod can be extended to 16.5 hours using red (fluorescent light), far-red (incandescent light), or a 1:1 ratio of red to far-red light.

Comparative Results of Photoselective Shade Nets Treatment in Strawberry Cultivation

Temperature’s Influence on Yield and Quality of Three Japanese Strawberry Cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) (“Sachinoka,” “Benihoppe,” and “Tochiotome”)

INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON THE YIELD AND QUALITY OF THREE STRAWBERRY ( Fragaria * anannasa Duch) CULTIVARS 

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.1014.1983&rep=rep1&type=pdf
shading netting used on crop field
With the use of the OBAMALLA® shading net, crops obtain better results in terms of growth also quality.

Yield Parameters

Yield parameters include fruit length, fruit weight, fruit width, and the number of fruits harvested per plant. Quality parameters are fruit color and firmness. Other vegetative growth parameters include leaf length and leaf area. The optimal day/night temperature for fruit development, length, width, and weight was 26/14 ºC. These parameters decreased as the temperature increased throughout the study period. Additionally, fruit firmness decreased as temperature increased. The fruit’s surface color became darker and more intensely pigmented when the temperature rose to 34/23 ºC.

Strawberries: Suitable Environmental Conditions

Strawberry plants are highly sensitive to environmental variations. Factors such as water availability, day and night temperatures, and natural light intensity affect fruit size. Temperature stress is a significant challenge for strawberry production worldwide. Field-grown plants often experience fluctuating temperatures that profoundly affect plant metabolism. Reduced plant growth due to high temperatures have be widely document in horticultural crops like tomatoes, grapes, and strawberries. Generally, exposure to high temperatures (35ºC) results in reduced vegetative growth and yield. High temperatures adversely affect vegetative growth and fruit quality in tomatoes.

Effect of Temperature on Total Fruit Number per Plant

The number of strawberry flowers and fruits is related to the number and diameter of crowns, which are indicators of the plant’s yield potential. Genetic and environmental variations are not the only factors affecting strawberry production. Temperature and climatic factors such as humidity also influence strawberry production. The highest fruit numbers were recorded with shade nets. As maximum and minimum temperatures increase, plant growth decreases. High temperatures inhibit cellular metabolism and chloroplast biogenesis, reduce chloroplast photoreductive activity, and alter lipid-protein interactions, ultimately decreasing photosynthetic capacity.

crops protected with shade netting
Crops placed under the photoselective agricultural shading nets show good quality results.

Effect of Temperature on Fresh Fruit Weight, Fruit Length, and Fruit Width

Fresh fruit weight, fruit width, and fruit length are crucial quality factors for strawberries also depend on the plant’s water content. Fresh fruit weight, fruit length, also fruit width decrease as temperature increases. Strawberry yield also fresh fruit weight are negatively affect by rising temperatures.

Effect of Temperature on Leaf Area and Leaf Height

A plant’s ability to photosynthesize, leading to subsequent fruit production, heavily depends on leaf area. The leaf surface serves as a light interception point and entry point for chlorophyll, which are vital for the growth and development of all plants. However, strawberries grown at higher temperatures have smaller leaf sizes and leaf areas. Additionally, canopy development in strawberries is more limited at warmer temperatures, leading to lower photosynthesis rates and reduced fruit yield. At higher temperatures, more assimilates are direct towards shoot development rather than fruit development (fruit weight, width, and length).

Photoselective Shade Nets Affects Flowering in Long Days in Short-Day Strawberry Cultivars

HORTSCIENCE 43(7):2245–2247. 2008. Red Light Affects Flowering Under Long Days in a Short-day Strawberry Cultivar Fumiomi Takeda and D. Michael Glenn

https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/5532/Takeda%20et%20al%202008%20red%20light.pdf

A high proportion of far-red light plays a role in floral bud induction. Thus, transplants of some short-day cultivars made in early July can flower and fruit in the fall and the following spring, allowing producers to harvest two crops within one year from a single planting. Treating strawberry crowns with red light (600-702 nm) reduces or delays flowering.

Photoselective Shade Nets
The resistance of OBAMALLA® green agricultural shade netting creates a suitable environment by stabilizing the intensity of UV rays.

Soil temperature can also have a direct or indirect effect on vegetative growth. Mulches that keep soil temperatures below 25°C promote greater reproductive development. Strawberries can have their fruiting season advanced or extended as long as the net provides a suitable temperature. Covering the plants from fall to the beginning of flowering in spring increases average temperature, leaf growth, inflorescence, and flower number. Low-temperature and short-day treatments are use to precondition nursery plants. Plants are maintained at temperatures above 5°C to prevent deep dormancy and promote continuous growth and flowering. Plants are often grow in tunnels or under shade nets to protect the fruits from adverse weather conditions.

Effect of Far-Red Light, Temperature, and Plant Age on Morphological Changes and Floral Induction in Strawberries

Effect of far-red light, temperature, and plant age on morphological changes also induction of flowering of a ‘June-bearing’ strawberry

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13580-016-0018-8

The Effects of Conditioning Strawberry Plug Plants under Altered Red/Far-red Light Environments

Brent L. Black, Harry J. Swartz and Gerald F. Deitzer, Bryan Butler, Craig K. Chandler

http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/40/5/1263.short

FLORAL INITIATION IN STRAWBERRY AND SOME EFFECTS OF RED AND FAR-RED RADIATION AS COMPONENTS OF CONTINUOUS WHITE LIGHT

W. B. Collins

Canadian Journal of Botany, 1966, 44(5): 663-668, https://doi.org/10.1139/b66-079

Significant floral induction in strawberry plants has been demonstrated with red light treatment. Altering red/far-red light using selective plastic films has shown effects on strawberry plant performance. In the first year, red light filtering film accelerated fruiting. However, in the second year, the effect of the red light filtering film was not significant.

Photoselective Shade Nets
Applying this OBAMALLA® woven mesh to your crops creates an environment with a pleasant temperature also ventilation for your crops.

Organic Raspberry Production in Tunnels

Organic Raspberry Production in Three-Season High Tunnels

http://www.canr.msu.edu/foodsystems/uploads/files/high_tunnel_raspberry_production.pdf
http://www.hort.cornell.edu/fruit/pdfs/low-tunnel-strawberries.pdf

Tunnels offer several potential advantages for raspberry production in humid regions:

•Increased plant yield.

•Extended harvest and marketing season.

•Higher berry yield.

•Reduced pests and diseases.

For organic producers, these benefits are particularly valuable since pesticide options are limited. Photoselective shade nets in strawberry cultivation vary light transmittance also provide adequate ventilation. They also reduce temperature by detecting infrared light and diffusing it. Photoselective shade nets are especially useful in strawberry cultivation, as optimal summer temperatures are below 26°C. To optimize yield, applying weed control nets is also recommend, acting as a barrier against weeds. Fungal diseases are greatly suppressed by keeping plants in non-humid environments.

Issues with Mold

Botrytis gray mold, a common field problem, is rare in protected environments. A significant limitation for strawberry growers is the short season during which berries are usually available for sale. Extending the berry production season into summer and late fall would be highly beneficial, opening new markets. Plastic nets protect berries and extend their season. Photoselective shade nets significantly reduce ultraviolet light that would typically promote fungal spore germination and reduce infrared light that produces heat. Thus, the season can be extended both before and after the typical season, ranging from 3 weeks to 5 months.

shade netting installed on the field for protection
This raschel mesh provides strong support by stabilizing the sun’s temperature so that crops are not damaged.

One advantage of nets is the near elimination of Botrytis gray mold as they limit humidity and inhibit spore germination by reducing ultraviolet light. Generally, pest incidence (gray mold and powdery mildew) is low under nets as long as fruit is regularly harvest and not left to rot in the field. Shade nets provide enough air circulation for flowers to be pollinated without bees. Humidity is reduce, so fruit rot is lower, and they retain enough heat during cold nights to prevent early frost and extend the season. Yields are substantially higher, and more of the harvest is marketable. Additionally, material costs are quickly recover through increase yields.

Fill out the form below to let us know your questions or comments:

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