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Manual for Developing an Organic Free-range Poultry Farming

Manual for Developing an Organic Free-range Poultry Farming

Arguments for Raising Free-Range Poultry

Small farm operators looking for a non-traditional agricultural enterprise to meet their farm’s unique needs should seriously consider venturing into poultry farming. Organic free-range poultry farming requires less initial capital, land, and equipment compared to other comparable ventures. Local media often facilitates the marketing of locally produced poultry products by conditioning the public to distrust the quality and safety of poultry products in store chains. As we’ve seen with locally grown products. The public prefers to buy locally produced poultry products because they perceive them as more natural and safer for their families to consume.

poultry farming

Nutrient Management

If the farm generates gross income of $2,500 or more, or has eight (8) animal units or more. The state requires producers to have a certified nutrient management plan. An animal unit is define as 453.5 kilograms (1,000 pounds), for example, 2,000 frying chickens weighing 1.81 kilograms (four pounds) each would be one animal unit. Animal units on a farm would include the total weight of all animals, including poultry, goats, sheep, cows, horses, etc.

poutru farming machne

Getting Started

The least expensive way to start a organic free-range poultry farming enterprise on a farm is by purchasing chicks and raising them to production age. There are some advantages and disadvantages to doing it this way. Apart from being less costly, chicks are less likely to bring disease to the farm that could devastate the flock. Another significant positive aspect of starting with chicks is that they will grow to become familiar and comfortable with the people around them. The obvious downside of chicks is that they require a lot of care to reach production age.

Organic free-range poultry farming

Producers should always expect some chick mortality along the way; typically, around 1 to 2% of chicks die in the first few days after arriving at the farm. These are typically runts and those coming from the hatchery sick. If the mortality rate during this same period of time is 4 or 5% or more, something is wrong. Another option, besides chicks, when starting a poultry enterprise is to get start birds; these are typically young birds under a year old. This works well for egg-laying operations; for example, a producer might consider getting pullets. W hich are young hens just coming into egg-laying age. These are a good deal if a producer can get them. This reduces much of the risk of raising chicks and saves money by not having to feed unproductive birds.

Getting Chicks

When starting an enterprise with chicks, buy 25% more birds than are expect to be need. This allows for mortality and culling. When starting a laying flock, decide how many eggs will be need and size the flock accordingly. Unless the enterprise includes raising cockerels (young roosters) for meat, most of the birds should be hens, as many roosters will fight. Initially, it’s a good idea to get chicks from a hatchery, however. A producer may decide, after gaining more experience, to incubate their own chicks. Once chicks are brought to the farm, be sure to control for cat and dog presence. They can be the most deadly predators of young birds. Rats are also serious predators of chicks. One really doesn’t want to add predator losses to the mortality rate that is normally expected with chicks.

Housing Chicks

A 1.8 x 2.45m (6×8 feet) room is adequate for 100 to 200 chicks and a 4.5 x 4.5m (15×15 feet) room can accommodate 400 chicks. If more than 200 to 300 birds are crowded into a room, they should be separated. Studies have shown that performance decreases in groups of more than 300 birds. More space should be provided for the birds as they grow.

the organic free-range poultry farming

Fill out the form below to let us know your questions or comments:

Arguments for Raising Free-Range Poultry

Small farm operators looking for a non-traditional agricultural enterprise to meet their farm’s unique needs should seriously consider venturing into poultry farming. Organic free-range poultry farming requires less initial capital, land, and equipment compared to other comparable ventures. Local media often facilitates the marketing of locally produced poultry products by conditioning the public to distrust the quality and safety of poultry products in store chains. As we’ve seen with locally grown products. The public prefers to buy locally produced poultry products because they perceive them as more natural and safer for their families to consume.

poultry farming

Nutrient Management

If the farm generates gross income of $2,500 or more, or has eight (8) animal units or more. The state requires producers to have a certified nutrient management plan. An animal unit is define as 453.5 kilograms (1,000 pounds), for example, 2,000 frying chickens weighing 1.81 kilograms (four pounds) each would be one animal unit. Animal units on a farm would include the total weight of all animals, including poultry, goats, sheep, cows, horses, etc.

poutru farming machne

Getting Started

The least expensive way to start a organic free-range poultry farming enterprise on a farm is by purchasing chicks and raising them to production age. There are some advantages and disadvantages to doing it this way. Apart from being less costly, chicks are less likely to bring disease to the farm that could devastate the flock. Another significant positive aspect of starting with chicks is that they will grow to become familiar and comfortable with the people around them. The obvious downside of chicks is that they require a lot of care to reach production age.

Organic free-range poultry farming

Producers should always expect some chick mortality along the way; typically, around 1 to 2% of chicks die in the first few days after arriving at the farm. These are typically runts and those coming from the hatchery sick. If the mortality rate during this same period of time is 4 or 5% or more, something is wrong. Another option, besides chicks, when starting a poultry enterprise is to get start birds; these are typically young birds under a year old. This works well for egg-laying operations; for example, a producer might consider getting pullets. W hich are young hens just coming into egg-laying age. These are a good deal if a producer can get them. This reduces much of the risk of raising chicks and saves money by not having to feed unproductive birds.

Getting Chicks

When starting an enterprise with chicks, buy 25% more birds than are expect to be need. This allows for mortality and culling. When starting a laying flock, decide how many eggs will be need and size the flock accordingly. Unless the enterprise includes raising cockerels (young roosters) for meat, most of the birds should be hens, as many roosters will fight. Initially, it’s a good idea to get chicks from a hatchery, however. A producer may decide, after gaining more experience, to incubate their own chicks. Once chicks are brought to the farm, be sure to control for cat and dog presence. They can be the most deadly predators of young birds. Rats are also serious predators of chicks. One really doesn’t want to add predator losses to the mortality rate that is normally expected with chicks.

Housing Chicks

A 1.8 x 2.45m (6×8 feet) room is adequate for 100 to 200 chicks and a 4.5 x 4.5m (15×15 feet) room can accommodate 400 chicks. If more than 200 to 300 birds are crowded into a room, they should be separated. Studies have shown that performance decreases in groups of more than 300 birds. More space should be provided for the birds as they grow.

the organic free-range poultry farming

Fill out the form below to let us know your questions or comments:

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