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How to cover your citrus tree with frost blanketing to protect it from cold weather

How to cover your citrus tree with frost blanketing to protect it from cold weather

You can use INVERNAVELO® frost blanket to protect citrus trees


Citrus trees grow best in a subtropical climate. According to the US Department of Agriculture, that means from zone 8 to 11. Citrus trees need a warm climate to grow but can survive short periods of cold weather. Oranges (C. Sinensis), for example, tolerate temperatures as low as 21 degrees Fahrenheit. Even though they can survive freezing temperatures, you should cover citrus trees when expecting a frost. Doing so will reduce the impact of the frost on the tree and increase its chance of survival. This is especially important for trees that are younger than three years old. You should take care to cover them completely and even keep them covered through the winter if you live in an area that frequently experiences low temperatures.

INVERNAVELO® Manta Anti Heladas
wrap INVERNAVELO® frost blanket around the trunk of the tree and its lower branches. If your trees are exposed, without any foliage, it becomes especially vital to protect them from frost.
  1. Water your citrus tree thoroughly one day before the forecast frost to help it survive through the low temperatures. Water stores warmth, and moist soil conducts heat better than dry. Darker soils absorb more warmth than lighter colors.
  2. Wrap INVERNAVELO® frost blanket around the trunk of your tree. Packing blankets also work well for this. Tie the blanket in place with zip ties. Cover the branches as well, especially if they are bare of foliage.
  3. Drive four stakes into the ground around the tree. You might use 2x2s or PVC pipe as stakes. Your stakes should be 1 or 2 feet taller than your orange tree even after they’ve been driven 1 to 2 feet into the ground. They should be placed about 1 foot from any branches so that the tree doesn’t touch the frost cover.
  4. Place a large sheet of INVERNAVELO® frost cover or two pieces of sheet plastic over the structure. If you have to use several pieces of plastic, make sure that the edges overlap so that cold air won’t reach your citrus tree. You need two to three feet of extra plastic laying on the ground on each side.
  5. Put pieces of wood on the extra plastic lying on the ground to hold the frost cover in place. Roll the wood in the frost blanket or plastic sheeting so that it won’t come loose and let cold air in that could affect the tree. You’ll need to wrap boards two or three times in the extra plastic.
  6. Keep the tree covered until the cold spell has finished.
Tela anti heladas
cover INVERNAVELO® keeps citrus trees warm so that frost doesn’t damage the fruit.

What you’ll need


⦁ INVERNAVELO® Frost Blanket
⦁ Zip ties
⦁ Long stakes or poles
⦁ A rubber mallet
⦁ Plastic sheeting
⦁ Boards

Advice


⦁ When the frost has passed, expose just one side of your tree by lifting the frost cover. This will save time next time a frost is forecasted. Slowly roll up the frost blanket as you uncover the tree and leave the roll on the ground beside the tree. Use the boards from that side of the tree to weigh down the rolled-up frost cover until you need it the next time. When a frost is forecasted, you’ll just need to unroll the frost blanket and place it over the stakes, then roll up the edge with the board-anchors.
⦁ Completely covering the tree is only necessary if you are expecting a harsh frost. If a light frost is forecasted, then you may not need to cover your trees so thoroughly. Mature citrus trees can survive light frost without any cover, but you will need to wrap their trunks to protect them from stronger frosts.

Manta térmica cubriendo árbol

You can use INVERNAVELO® frost blanket to protect citrus trees


Citrus trees grow best in a subtropical climate. According to the US Department of Agriculture, that means from zone 8 to 11. Citrus trees need a warm climate to grow but can survive short periods of cold weather. Oranges (C. Sinensis), for example, tolerate temperatures as low as 21 degrees Fahrenheit. Even though they can survive freezing temperatures, you should cover citrus trees when expecting a frost. Doing so will reduce the impact of the frost on the tree and increase its chance of survival. This is especially important for trees that are younger than three years old. You should take care to cover them completely and even keep them covered through the winter if you live in an area that frequently experiences low temperatures.

INVERNAVELO® Manta Anti Heladas
wrap INVERNAVELO® frost blanket around the trunk of the tree and its lower branches. If your trees are exposed, without any foliage, it becomes especially vital to protect them from frost.
  1. Water your citrus tree thoroughly one day before the forecast frost to help it survive through the low temperatures. Water stores warmth, and moist soil conducts heat better than dry. Darker soils absorb more warmth than lighter colors.
  2. Wrap INVERNAVELO® frost blanket around the trunk of your tree. Packing blankets also work well for this. Tie the blanket in place with zip ties. Cover the branches as well, especially if they are bare of foliage.
  3. Drive four stakes into the ground around the tree. You might use 2x2s or PVC pipe as stakes. Your stakes should be 1 or 2 feet taller than your orange tree even after they’ve been driven 1 to 2 feet into the ground. They should be placed about 1 foot from any branches so that the tree doesn’t touch the frost cover.
  4. Place a large sheet of INVERNAVELO® frost cover or two pieces of sheet plastic over the structure. If you have to use several pieces of plastic, make sure that the edges overlap so that cold air won’t reach your citrus tree. You need two to three feet of extra plastic laying on the ground on each side.
  5. Put pieces of wood on the extra plastic lying on the ground to hold the frost cover in place. Roll the wood in the frost blanket or plastic sheeting so that it won’t come loose and let cold air in that could affect the tree. You’ll need to wrap boards two or three times in the extra plastic.
  6. Keep the tree covered until the cold spell has finished.
Tela anti heladas
cover INVERNAVELO® keeps citrus trees warm so that frost doesn’t damage the fruit.

What you’ll need


⦁ INVERNAVELO® Frost Blanket
⦁ Zip ties
⦁ Long stakes or poles
⦁ A rubber mallet
⦁ Plastic sheeting
⦁ Boards

Advice


⦁ When the frost has passed, expose just one side of your tree by lifting the frost cover. This will save time next time a frost is forecasted. Slowly roll up the frost blanket as you uncover the tree and leave the roll on the ground beside the tree. Use the boards from that side of the tree to weigh down the rolled-up frost cover until you need it the next time. When a frost is forecasted, you’ll just need to unroll the frost blanket and place it over the stakes, then roll up the edge with the board-anchors.
⦁ Completely covering the tree is only necessary if you are expecting a harsh frost. If a light frost is forecasted, then you may not need to cover your trees so thoroughly. Mature citrus trees can survive light frost without any cover, but you will need to wrap their trunks to protect them from stronger frosts.

Manta térmica cubriendo árbol

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