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Ecological” raffia twine for the field reduces agricultural residues

Ecological” raffia twine for the field reduces agricultural residues

Raffia twine for the field for cotton

Ancient Techniques in Agriculture

Using raffia twine for the field is one of the oldest and most common techniques in agriculture. Since its inception, twine has been employed in techniques like cucumber tutoring or tomato twine systems. In non-industrialized greenhouses, the constant management of waste generated by raffia twine for the field has become a major issue.

raffia for crops
Raffia for crops is a technique that has become very popular as a method of plant support.

Processing Regions

In regions like Catalonia, managing the waste generated by twine has been a significant problem for farmers. Especially between May and June, when around 50% of the total organic waste is produce. This high volume of waste has drawn attention from various administrative bodies also unions worldwide. As many countries lack processing plants. And those industrialized nations that do have such facilities struggle to handle such large volumes.

raffia twine for the field
Currently, raffia is no longer use due to the amount of waste it leaves behind, so farmers are opting for other methods.

Traditional Practices with raffia twine for the field

The ongoing search for a solution to manage the waste generated by raffia twine for the field has been challenging. It’s difficult to meet the demands or reconcile the roles of the primary stakeholders: farmers, marketers, transporters, also waste managers in countries that have them.

raffia twine for the field: To Use or Not to Use?

In this context, many have replaced raffia twine for the field with materials like garden nets. However, the removal of twine due to the scarcity of some raw materials and its cost has become one of the sector’s biggest dilemmas. Some believe that certain plants perform better with this material.

The growing debate over the cost of using raffia twine for the field and its role in the transmission of pathogens that infect crops has become a major concern.

Eco-friendly Options

For this reason, Ángel Granero Mañas, a sector member in Barcelona, proposed a “more eco-friendly” solution to this issue in 2016. “One day, I was with some friends in their greenhouse. I started asking about the problems they were facing. They explained the use of twine to me, and I began to think about it,” Granero recalls, expressing his deep respect for the agricultural sector.

main methods of mentoring
At the end of the growing cycle the raffia begins to be home to many fungi that are gradually stored there.

Field twine is discarded after each crop cycle because its cracks allow microbes, bacteria, viruses, and insects to take refuge in its fissures, worn out by sun exposure. The strength of the thread is relatively lower compare to trellis nets.

Eco-friendly raffia twine for the field

Granero’s innovation involves using a new cotton fiber for more sensitive crops. For the past year, they have been trying to replace traditional twine by manufacturing ropes for staking with this material. These ropes can be easily unraveled into thin strands that blend imperceptibly with other waste also can be ingested by animals without harm. This initiative aims to patent 100% natural cotton to replace twine.

Supervising Field Twine

The idea is not only to solve the problem of waste generation but also to address the issue faced by those with farm crops. The second problem is that unsupervised farm animals can eat the plants’ leaves. Leading to constant illness or poisoning from consuming field twine, which contains harmful chemicals like polyethylene and polypropylene.

raffia twine for the field
The disadvantages offered by raffia make farmers opt for better methods to use on their crops.

Cotton Mesh

Due to his experience in the sector, Granero devised a replacement material: a cotton-based rope for staking. This cotton is produced by companies for sale and has been a boon in the fishing industry. For the past five years, these companies have been making cotton nets. Initially adapted for the fishing sector to replace nylon nets that do not decompose in the sea. Causing losses and poisoning in that sector. Granero indicates that solving this endemic problem in the fishing sector, which also presented challenges during collection, has been possible thanks to his company’s 100% natural cotton net. It dissolves in water, being eco-friendly and non-polluting to the ecosystem.

how to stake with trellis netting
In addition, raffia has a high cost, something that farmers prefer to avoid and choose another support system.

Cotton Raffia

However, although this cotton twine proposal addresses a major sector issue, it faces resistance from farmers due to its price. This proposal has been in development for three years. The raw cotton material costs around three euros per kilo, but with handling and transport, it totals around five euros. Twine typically costs about two euros per kilo, but it requires cleaning. Three kilos of this chemical material cover a hectare of greenhouse, while three kilos of cotton cover roughly the same area.

raffia over crops
Much has been said about the use of raffia to be used on your crops.

Cost of Raw Materials

Despite the lower raw material costs for twine compared to cotton, proponents of this initiative argue that the cost of cleaning a hectare of twine in one full day adds extra expenses, which offset the cost of cotton that doesn’t require this expense. Although there are still varied opinions on this project, the adoption of cotton twine for the fields will have to go through many phases before achieving a significant global impact. What do you think about this new proposal?

Fill out the form below to let us know your questions or comments:

Raffia twine for the field for cotton

Ancient Techniques in Agriculture

Using raffia twine for the field is one of the oldest and most common techniques in agriculture. Since its inception, twine has been employed in techniques like cucumber tutoring or tomato twine systems. In non-industrialized greenhouses, the constant management of waste generated by raffia twine for the field has become a major issue.

raffia for crops
Raffia for crops is a technique that has become very popular as a method of plant support.

Processing Regions

In regions like Catalonia, managing the waste generated by twine has been a significant problem for farmers. Especially between May and June, when around 50% of the total organic waste is produce. This high volume of waste has drawn attention from various administrative bodies also unions worldwide. As many countries lack processing plants. And those industrialized nations that do have such facilities struggle to handle such large volumes.

raffia twine for the field
Currently, raffia is no longer use due to the amount of waste it leaves behind, so farmers are opting for other methods.

Traditional Practices with raffia twine for the field

The ongoing search for a solution to manage the waste generated by raffia twine for the field has been challenging. It’s difficult to meet the demands or reconcile the roles of the primary stakeholders: farmers, marketers, transporters, also waste managers in countries that have them.

raffia twine for the field: To Use or Not to Use?

In this context, many have replaced raffia twine for the field with materials like garden nets. However, the removal of twine due to the scarcity of some raw materials and its cost has become one of the sector’s biggest dilemmas. Some believe that certain plants perform better with this material.

The growing debate over the cost of using raffia twine for the field and its role in the transmission of pathogens that infect crops has become a major concern.

Eco-friendly Options

For this reason, Ángel Granero Mañas, a sector member in Barcelona, proposed a “more eco-friendly” solution to this issue in 2016. “One day, I was with some friends in their greenhouse. I started asking about the problems they were facing. They explained the use of twine to me, and I began to think about it,” Granero recalls, expressing his deep respect for the agricultural sector.

main methods of mentoring
At the end of the growing cycle the raffia begins to be home to many fungi that are gradually stored there.

Field twine is discarded after each crop cycle because its cracks allow microbes, bacteria, viruses, and insects to take refuge in its fissures, worn out by sun exposure. The strength of the thread is relatively lower compare to trellis nets.

Eco-friendly raffia twine for the field

Granero’s innovation involves using a new cotton fiber for more sensitive crops. For the past year, they have been trying to replace traditional twine by manufacturing ropes for staking with this material. These ropes can be easily unraveled into thin strands that blend imperceptibly with other waste also can be ingested by animals without harm. This initiative aims to patent 100% natural cotton to replace twine.

Supervising Field Twine

The idea is not only to solve the problem of waste generation but also to address the issue faced by those with farm crops. The second problem is that unsupervised farm animals can eat the plants’ leaves. Leading to constant illness or poisoning from consuming field twine, which contains harmful chemicals like polyethylene and polypropylene.

raffia twine for the field
The disadvantages offered by raffia make farmers opt for better methods to use on their crops.

Cotton Mesh

Due to his experience in the sector, Granero devised a replacement material: a cotton-based rope for staking. This cotton is produced by companies for sale and has been a boon in the fishing industry. For the past five years, these companies have been making cotton nets. Initially adapted for the fishing sector to replace nylon nets that do not decompose in the sea. Causing losses and poisoning in that sector. Granero indicates that solving this endemic problem in the fishing sector, which also presented challenges during collection, has been possible thanks to his company’s 100% natural cotton net. It dissolves in water, being eco-friendly and non-polluting to the ecosystem.

how to stake with trellis netting
In addition, raffia has a high cost, something that farmers prefer to avoid and choose another support system.

Cotton Raffia

However, although this cotton twine proposal addresses a major sector issue, it faces resistance from farmers due to its price. This proposal has been in development for three years. The raw cotton material costs around three euros per kilo, but with handling and transport, it totals around five euros. Twine typically costs about two euros per kilo, but it requires cleaning. Three kilos of this chemical material cover a hectare of greenhouse, while three kilos of cotton cover roughly the same area.

raffia over crops
Much has been said about the use of raffia to be used on your crops.

Cost of Raw Materials

Despite the lower raw material costs for twine compared to cotton, proponents of this initiative argue that the cost of cleaning a hectare of twine in one full day adds extra expenses, which offset the cost of cotton that doesn’t require this expense. Although there are still varied opinions on this project, the adoption of cotton twine for the fields will have to go through many phases before achieving a significant global impact. What do you think about this new proposal?

Fill out the form below to let us know your questions or comments:

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