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Crop Rotation–How to Make a Plan and Get the Most Out of It

Crop Rotation–How to Make a Plan and Get the Most Out of It

Advantages of Crop Rotation and How to Plan Rotations Correctly

Crop rotation is essential.  When we make plans for a vegetable plot. It is important to keep in mind that each kind of vegetable has a specific nutrient requirement. Also absorbs those nutrients from the soil, and, those that it does not need, keep on accumulating.  For this reason large soil imbalances are create, which, in the long run, can be harmful to plants.  What’s more, in these unbalanced soils, pests and fungus are quite common.  Therefore, if we really want a viable ecological garden, crop rotation. Will be necessary in order to avoid problems and achieve good results.

We should alternate plant families with different nutrient requirements in a given area in successive cropping cycles.  This means that, after harvesting a crop, we will not again plant a crop of the same family where we just harvested.  We only need a notebook in which we sketch out our plan, showing the plots, growing tables, or pots, that we want to use.  We need to number them also write down what got plant in each one, thereby keeping an exact account from season to season.  To facilitate this task, a list should be made and the crops grouped according to their requirements (nutrients, water, light, etc.).  These groupings will facilitate the crop rotation process.  There is classification by family, classification according to which part of the plant is edible, and classification by nutrient requirements for plants in a crop rotation program.

La rotación de cultivos
Crop rotation is quite effective for avoiding wearing out and impoverishing soil.

Classification by family

Solanaceae:  peppers, tomatoes, eggplants,  potatoes…

Crucifers:  cabbages, broccoli, turnips…

Compositae:  lettuce, Swiss chard, endive…

Cucurbits:  melons, cucumbers, squash…

Legumes:  beans, fava beans, peas

Alliaceae:  onions, garlic, scallions

Umbelliferae:  carrots, parsley, fennel…

Chenopodioideae:  spinach, wheat, buckwheat…

Classification according to which part of the plant is edible

Tubers:  carrots, turnips, potatoes

Classification by nutrient requirement

Normally two or three years need to pass before crops of the same family can be plant again in a given area.  This way crop rotation is matched to nutrient requirement.  For example, we can first grow plants that are the most nutrient ravenous, such as fruit or Solanaceae, followed by leafy greens, then root crops, and, finally, legumes.  It should be noted that legumes are also often grown to be used as green manure since they enrich the soil this will result in a viable ecological garden.

Advantages of Crop Rotation and How to Plan Rotations Correctly

Crop rotation is essential.  When we make plans for a vegetable plot. It is important to keep in mind that each kind of vegetable has a specific nutrient requirement. Also absorbs those nutrients from the soil, and, those that it does not need, keep on accumulating.  For this reason large soil imbalances are create, which, in the long run, can be harmful to plants.  What’s more, in these unbalanced soils, pests and fungus are quite common.  Therefore, if we really want a viable ecological garden, crop rotation. Will be necessary in order to avoid problems and achieve good results.

We should alternate plant families with different nutrient requirements in a given area in successive cropping cycles.  This means that, after harvesting a crop, we will not again plant a crop of the same family where we just harvested.  We only need a notebook in which we sketch out our plan, showing the plots, growing tables, or pots, that we want to use.  We need to number them also write down what got plant in each one, thereby keeping an exact account from season to season.  To facilitate this task, a list should be made and the crops grouped according to their requirements (nutrients, water, light, etc.).  These groupings will facilitate the crop rotation process.  There is classification by family, classification according to which part of the plant is edible, and classification by nutrient requirements for plants in a crop rotation program.

La rotación de cultivos
Crop rotation is quite effective for avoiding wearing out and impoverishing soil.

Classification by family

Solanaceae:  peppers, tomatoes, eggplants,  potatoes…

Crucifers:  cabbages, broccoli, turnips…

Compositae:  lettuce, Swiss chard, endive…

Cucurbits:  melons, cucumbers, squash…

Legumes:  beans, fava beans, peas

Alliaceae:  onions, garlic, scallions

Umbelliferae:  carrots, parsley, fennel…

Chenopodioideae:  spinach, wheat, buckwheat…

Classification according to which part of the plant is edible

Tubers:  carrots, turnips, potatoes

Classification by nutrient requirement

Normally two or three years need to pass before crops of the same family can be plant again in a given area.  This way crop rotation is matched to nutrient requirement.  For example, we can first grow plants that are the most nutrient ravenous, such as fruit or Solanaceae, followed by leafy greens, then root crops, and, finally, legumes.  It should be noted that legumes are also often grown to be used as green manure since they enrich the soil this will result in a viable ecological garden.

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